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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Extract from the Introduction: ‘Let me start with a clear definition of where I stand in the vast field of drama for children. First, the age-group will be what is sometimes called senior primary, that is, from about eight years to thirteen years. What a rich soil for planting the seeds of drama! And how differently one must treat them compared to high school students…

 

‘In Part II of this book, you will find the three-act play The Star Children, which will give you an idea of how a producer can write his or her own play, suited to the school and its budget.’

 

 

Extract from  Chapter One - Finding the Play: ‘It has been said that without an audience, you don’t have a play. But without a play, the right play, you don’t begin to have theatre. So, the vital step, on which so much will depend, is to find the play which will stimulate and invigorate you, and in turn your pupils, the play which suits your available acting talent, and the play which fits your stage and your budget.’

  

‘This may all sound so obvious, but anyone who has attempted school drama will agree that finding the right play is often the most difficult step of all. So much so, that I have devoted a whole chapter to it.’

ISBN - 978-0-9814276-3-8

Hierdie boek sal binnekort ook in Afrikaans beskikbaar wees.

SOME OF GAIL GILLINGS’S BRILLIANTLY DRAWN ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE BOOK…

 

Please address your responses below or email Patrick Coyne on info@patrickcoyne.co.za

SHARE THE STAGE! PLAY PRODUCTION IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS

SHARE THE STAGE! - A REVIEW BY WELL-KNOWN STAGE ACTOR, PRODUCER, RADIO ACTOR, FRANK GRAHAM

  

This little gem should be prescribed reading for every primary school language and drama teacher in the country - and it wouldn’t do their high school colleagues any harm to follow suit either.

   

The book is divided into two parts, the first being Mr Coyne’s invaluable insight into directing a play featuring primary school actors. He’s been there; he’s done it, and his advice is worth its weight in gold. He recognises all the pitfalls and has a solution for every problem, never forgetting to remind us of the rewards of seeing one’s efforts bear fruit.

   

One of the problems could be finding a suitable vehicle for one’s eager young thespians and this is where the second part comes in: if you can’t find  an appropriate play, try writing one yourself! He then presents his own very effective attempt, which he proceeded to stage.

    

I like Mr Coyne’s prose style. He has a breezy, chatty way of expressing his ideas which make reading his work so effortless; it’s almost as if one was listening to the man. Another reviewer may take him to task for a slight tendency to over-employ the comma. I will do no such thing. He uses the comma exactly in the same way as one would if we used commas in our speech; that’s  what makes him “listenable”. An enviable talent.

    

His love of the stage is evident throughout and Mr Coyne makes no bones about how important a communication tool the presentation of a play can and should be. I do not believe in elocution lessons; I have heard the frighteningly artificial results of such training. But our writer recognises the crucial importance of clear, articulate speech, and that encouraging this should be the priority of every language teacher.It’s all about communication … and Mr Coyne is a past-master at that!

    

 

 

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Producer’s notes:

‘Exit hopeless! Children got jammed in doorway!’

Some actors easily learn the other actors’ lines and take pride in demonstrating the fact.

Get close behind an actor

and mutter advice in his ear

while the dialogue is going on…